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Feb 6, 2008



This week we're doing a little viewer mail before delving into our topic: the nature of war within cyberspace. So much of our lives tied to the internet, and in this increasingly interconnected society what does conflict consist of when the battlefield is entirely virtual? Is there any such thing as war online, or is it more like a giant game of Battleship between faceless combatants?

Opening Music: "Fire In The Sky" by Dave London
Closing Music: "ET" by Peplab

 




Joe
eleven and a half years ago

Hey Brian,

Thanks for writing in to clear that up for us. Ultimately you\'re right, the problem is that both choices require a bit of sacrifice. Based on what you\'ve written I\'d side with organic but if corporations are latching onto that too it\'s only a matter of time before the \'organic\' part of the process becomes marginalized in favor or profit.

Sean
eleven and a half years ago

For some pretty good history of the beginning of the so called \"hacker\" culture, Cory Doctorow recently did a podcast reading of Bruce Sterling\'s 1992 book \"The Hacker Crackdown\". URL =>
http://craphound.com/hackercrackdown.xml

Just thought I\'d toss it out there. Thanks for the great podcast!

Ben
eleven and a half years ago

Ohhhh mann!! so cool to hear about the \'soda machine hack\'! In my middle school days (2000/2001) I once tried this method where you tape a dollar with packing tape to create a kind of \'plastic handle\' and then pull it out write before the machine swallows it, however we failed miserably.

On a serious note however, I am worried more about the reaction AGAINST hacking. I think something like back oriface is and could be, whatever the original intent, an incredible learning tool. The same thing with emulators that get such a shitty rap for obvious purposes (in our \'post-Napster\' world). People NEED to learn about this stuff. I think we need to encourage learning like this so people won\'t look at hacking with such a malicioius gaze. Have you guys read any of Seymour Papert\'s writing? He developed Logo, a simple graphical programming language, in the intent of helping kids and non-programmers learn programming and how FUN it could be. I think there is some of that with the contemporary \'DIY\' stuff (Make magazine which you guys mentioned the other week with the TV B Gone, and Processing, similar to Logo but more for artists [you guys might be into this], as well as Flash, or Arduino), but it doesn\'t seem to go anywhere unless its coming from a \'real\' engineer or \'on high.\' In other words, if your kid is on his computer all day and isn\'t whacking off or talking about how every video on youtube is fake all time; help him get a job doing that. He\'s learning.


As far as the dangers of programming/hacking its already happening! The NSA has already has already got caught basically snooping at personal information. AT&T got caught giving personal information to the internet (one reason I refuse to get on the iphone bandwagon). And also with our fucking voting system. Scaaaary, scary stuff. No computers needed most of the time. You guys need to watch, if you haven\'t already:

The Trouble with Touchscreens
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8424269587813976191

and Hacking Democracy
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4463776866669054201

anyway, tell me what you think!!1!11 lol

darwingodwin
eleven and a half years ago

\"The future always comes too fast and in the wrong order.\" ~ Alvin Toffler

You should check out \"War and Anti-War\" by the above author. Even though it was written 10+ years ago, there are some amazing ideas about the subject of invisible warfare. One idea that lingers is that in the 21st century, a succesful war will be defined by convincing your enemy that they were the victors. Nice.